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Arria, Amelia

Amelia Arria
Associate Professor
Department of Behavioral and Community Health
School of Public Health
1242Y School of Public Health
Phone: 
301-405-9795
General Research Interests: 
  • Risk and resiliency factors of mental health in young adults and adolescents
  • Mental health service utilization
  • Predictors of suicidal behaviors
  • Addiction treatment

Dr. Arria's primary research focus has been to understand familial, social, and individual risk and resiliency factors associated with mental health and substance abuse among adolescents and young adults. She has also completed studies related to mental health service utilization, predictors of suicidal behavior, and evaluations of addiction treatment. She is currently involved in several efforts to translate research findings for practical purposes by parents and policy makers, including her leadership role in the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, an initiative that brings together Maryland colleges to address the problem of excessive alcohol consumption and its consequences on their campuses and in their communities. Moreover, much of her research has direct relevance to both clinicians and policy makers. 

Background: 
 
Dr. Arria is currently the Director of the Center on Young Adult Health and Development at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and an Associate Professor with the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on the College Life Study, a longitudinal prospective study of health-risk behaviors among college students. She has authored more than 140 scientific peer-reviewed publications and is the recipient of numerous grant awards from foundations, and state and federal agencies. She received a B.S. in Human Development from Cornell University, a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health and completed postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.