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Moving matters: Ethnocentric behavior decreases when societal mobility rises

Moving matters: Ethnocentric behavior decreases when societal mobility rises


One can’t help but notice that migration is increasing. The trend over the last century has been toward greater mobility for more people around the world. Many people today live in a place different from where they were born, with different social norms and customs.

 

new study by University of Maryland researchers points to a surprising byproduct: increased mobility may help people to treat each other as individuals rather than as members of a defined social group. The work suggests that mobility counteracts the tendency of populations to become more ethnocentric—or prone to favor members of their own ethnic, tribal or national group while being hostile to other groups—over time. The study appears online in the journal Nature Scientific Reportson December 8, 2015.

December 15, 2015


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